SAG assesses measures of fruit exporting plants to prevent contagion of Covid-19

"Phytosanitary inspection is an activity where there is close contact, so it is essential that we be rigorous with biosecurity and do not put people's health at risk," said the Regional Director of SAG, Eduardo Jeria.

The Regional Director of SAG, Eduardo Jeria, highlighted the progress shown by the Ñuble fruit exporting plants in the implementation of measures aimed at reducing the risk of contagion from Covid-19 during the phytosanitary inspection, when visiting the Prize Proservice facilities of Chillán Viejo.

“We are verifying that all fruit exporting plants are in a position to guarantee that their workers and SAG teams are exposed to a minimum risk of contagion from Covid-19. Phytosanitary inspection is an activity where there is close contact, so it is essential that we be rigorous with biosecurity and that people's health is not exposed ”, explained Jeria.

The main measures consider the installation of transparent physical barriers in the inspection counter, availability of personal protective equipment, provision of sinks and soap in the inspection room, and the implementation of cleaning and sanitizing protocols in said rooms.

The authority expressed its confidence that these precautions will contribute to maintaining a good performance of the fruit export season 2020 - 2021, as in the previous period, during which almost 9 million 400 thousand boxes of fruit were inspected in Ñuble despite the difficulties posed by the onset of the pandemic.

The phytosanitary inspection activity began in mid-November and, to date, the SAG of Ñuble has verified more than 850 thousand boxes of fruit, of which 99% correspond to blueberries destined for the United States, China, Hong Kong, and the European Union. , South Korea, Japan and Russia.

Source
SAG

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